Federal Government’s Environmental Assessment Policy Review Details – terms of reference, biographies, etc

The below includes the Government’s press release, terms of reference for the review, and the expert panel members’ biographies.

Eric

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Government of Canada Moving Forward with Environmental Assessment Review

August 15, 2016 — Ottawa — Today, the Government of Canada took the next step to deliver on its commitment to review and restore confidence in Canada’s environmental and regulatory processes. This is essential to ensure that decisions on major projects are based on science, facts, and evidence, including traditional knowledge of Indigenous Peoples.

The Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Catherine McKenna, today announced the creation of a four-member Expert Panel to undertake the review of federal environmental assessment processes.

Johanne Gélinas has been appointed as the Chair of the Expert Panel. Doug Horswill, Rod Northey, and Renée Pelletier have been appointed as members of the Expert Panel. The Minister has issued the Terms of Reference, establishing the mandate and timelines for the Panel.

Panel members were selected based on their knowledge, experience and expertise relevant to federal environmental assessment processes. The Minister also considered the need for diversity in terms of Indigenous, regional and gender representation.

The Expert Panel will engage broadly with Canadians, including Indigenous groups, the public and a wide range of stakeholders. Consultation opportunities will be held across Canada starting in September 2016.

As part of the government’s commitment to renewing its relationship with Indigenous people based on trust, respect, and cooperation, the Expert Panel will work directly with Indigenous groups to ensure that their concerns are heard and taken into account throughout the review.

For details on funding availability for Indigenous groups or for more information, visit www.Canada.ca/environmentalreviews.

Quotes:

“Our belief that a clean environment and a strong economy go hand in hand is central to the health and well-being of Canadians. This is especially important as we work to get resources to market and develop major projects responsibly in the twenty-first century. Canadians expect and deserve to have an environmental assessment system that they can trust.”

“The members of the Expert Panel will bring a broad cross-section of views and experience to this process and I have every faith in their ability to complete this review in a way that represents the views of all Canadians. I had the opportunity to meet the Panel today and share my thoughts with them on the importance of this review. I look forward to receiving their report, as we move towards a more open, transparent and inclusive process leading to decisions based on facts and scientific evidence.”

The Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change

-30-

Media Contacts

Caitlin Workman
Press Secretary
Office of the Minister of Environment and Climate Change
819 -938-9436

Toban Morrison
Manager, Communications
Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
Toban.Morrison@ceaa-acee.gc.ca
819-635-2067

Follow us on Twitter: @CEAA_ACEE

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Review of environmental assessment processes: Expert Panel Terms of Reference

Context

Currently, federal environmental assessment informs government decision-making and supports sustainable development by identifying opportunities to avoid, eliminate or reduce potential adverse impacts on the environment and by ensuring that mitigation measures are applied.

The Government of Canada fully supports the principles of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, with the goal of renewing its relationship with Indigenous people in Canada and moving toward reconciliation.

The mandate letter of the Minister of Environment and Climate Change (the Minister) directs her, as a top priority, to “immediately review Canada’s environmental assessment processes to regain public trust and help get resources to market and introduce new, fair processes that will:

  • restore robust oversight and thorough environmental assessments of areas under federal jurisdiction, while working with provinces and territories to avoid duplication;
  • ensure decisions are based on science, facts and evidence and serve the public’s interest;
  • provide ways for Canadians to express their views and opportunities for experts to meaningfully participate; and
  • require project advocates to choose the best technologies available to reduce environmental impacts.”

In carrying out this review, the Minister is to be supported by the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, the Minister of Natural Resources, the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs and the Minister of Science.

The Minister is establishing an Expert Panel (the Panel) to conduct a review of environmental assessment processes. The Panel will engage and consult with Canadians, Indigenous people, provinces and territories and key stakeholders to develop recommendations on ways to strengthen and improve federal environmental assessment processes.

Mandate

The Panel’s review shall consider the goals and purpose of modern-day environmental assessment and be conducted in a manner that is consistent with these Terms of Reference.

The Panel shall prepare a report that sets out:

  • the conclusions, recommendations and rationale for the conclusions and recommendations of the Panel; and
  • a summary of the input received and how it was considered, including that from the Multi-Interest Advisory Committee or other experts.

Complementary mandates

Environmental assessment is one part of a broader regulatory framework. In addition to the Minister’s mandate to review federal environmental assessment processes, other ministers have also been mandated to carry out reviews and propose reforms to matters that intersect with environmental assessment. These include:

  • Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard– review changes to the Fisheries Act, restore lost protections and incorporate modern safeguards;
  • Minister of Natural Resources – modernize the National Energy Board to ensure that its composition reflects regional views and has sufficient expertise in fields such as environmental science, community development and Indigenous traditional knowledge; and
  • Minister of Transport – review changes to the Navigable Waters Protection Act, restore lost protections and incorporate modern safeguards.

The Panel shall focus on those relevant matters that intersect with federal environmental assessment. For example, this will include the roles of federal expert departments in supporting the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency as it conducts assessments and carries out compliance and enforcement activities. If matters are raised that are outside the scope of environmental assessment, but are related to the other mandated reviews, the Panel will receive the information and forward it to the appropriate secretariat or department supporting the mandated review. Participants who would like to participate in the other mandated reviews are not expected to duplicate efforts; a single submission can be made to one or more reviews. The relevant information will be shared with the appropriate review bodies with the consent of participants.

Given that the territories have distinct and effective environmental assessment regimes rooted in constitutionally-protected land claim agreements with specific mechanisms for consultation and public participation, matters related to northern environmental assessment regimes will not be reviewed by the Panel. However, the approaches adopted in these regimes may be of interest and relevance to the Panel as it considers ways to improve and strengthen federal environmental assessment processes.

Proposed amendments to the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act have already been introduced in Parliament. Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada will continue to work with Aboriginal and territorial governments on this front. The Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs intends to launch a process soon to work with all applicable First Nations and the territorial government in Northwest Territories to identify possible solutions related to the Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act.

Scope of review

In carrying out the review, the Panel shall consider the following matters raised in the Minister’s mandate letter and the mandate letter of the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs (Question 5):

  1. How to restore robust oversight and thorough environmental assessments of areas under federal jurisdiction, while working with the provinces and territories to avoid duplication?
  2. How to ensure decisions are based on science, facts and evidence and serve the public’s interest?
  3. How to provide ways for Canadians to express their views and opportunities for experts to meaningfully participate?
  4. How to require project advocates to choose the best technologies available to reduce environmental impacts?
  5. How to ensure that environmental assessment legislation is amended to enhance the consultation, engagement and participatory capacity of Indigenous groups in reviewing and monitoring major resource development projects?

This should include, for example:

  • how environmental assessment processes are conducted under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012, including practices and procedures, such as Indigenous engagement and consultation, public participation, the role of science and Indigenous knowledge, cumulative effects assessment and harmonization and coordination with other orders of government;
  • practices and approaches within Canada and internationally;
  • relationship between environmental assessment and other elements of the regulatory framework; and
  • alignment of various jurisdictional processes.

To recognize the objectives of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the Panel shall reflect the principles of the Declaration in its recommendations, as appropriate, especially with respect to the manner in which environmental assessment processes can be used to address potential impacts to potential or established Aboriginal and treaty rights.

The review process

The Panel

The Minister will appoint individuals to the Panel that have knowledge or experience relevant to environmental assessment processes.

The Panel will consist of four members, including one Chairperson. In the event that a Panel member resigns or is unable to continue to work, the remaining members shall constitute the Panel unless the Minister determines otherwise. In such circumstances the Minister may choose to replace the Panel member.

By way of letter from the Chairperson, the Panel may request clarification of its Terms of Reference from the Minister. The Panel shall continue with its review to the extent possible while waiting for a response in order to comply with the timelines of these Terms of Reference.

The Panel shall issue a notice to the public regarding any clarifications to its Terms of Reference and shall make those clarifications available on its website.

By way of letter from the Chairperson, the Panel may request an amendment to its Terms of Reference from the Minister. The Panel shall continue with its review to the extent possible while waiting for a response from the Minister in order to comply with the timelines of these Terms of Reference.

Upon appointment of the Panel, the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency will provide to the Panel the comments received during the comment period on the draft Terms of Reference. The input received through the online questionnaire “Improving Canada’s Environmental and Regulatory Processes” will also be provided to the Panel.

The Panel Secretariat

The Panel Secretariat will provide administrative, technical and procedural support as requested by the Panel and shall be comprised of staff from the federal public service, under the direction of an Executive Director. The Secretariat will report to the Panel and will be structured to allow the Panel to conduct its review in an efficient and cost-effective manner. The Secretariat will liaise and facilitate the flow of information with the relevant bodies supporting the other related mandated reviews. Members of the Secretariat shall be guided in their work and professional conduct by the Values and Ethics Code for the Public Service.

Conduct of the review

Timeline

The Panel shall complete its review and provide its report with recommendations to the Minister by January 31, 2017.

Public access to information

The Panel shall create and maintain a website which makes public the information it receives during the course of the review.

The Panel shall also offer opportunities for online engagement and provide procedures for the receipt of written submissions. The results of any online engagement carried out and any written submissions received shall be posted on the Panel’s website.

Public engagement

The Panel shall communicate directly with a broad cross-section of interested groups, organizations and individuals during its review to gain an understanding of issues and opportunities related to federal environmental assessment processes.

The Panel shall prepare a Public Engagement Plan outlining how and when it will conduct in-person events. In preparing the Plan, the Panel shall take into account the activities associated with the other mandated reviews. This Plan shall be posted on the Panel’s website.

The Panel shall also include any procedures necessary for the timely and efficient conduct of the events. The procedures will allow for the events to be open to the public and be conducted in a manner that offers all participants an opportunity to participate. The Panel shall ensure that a record of any in-person engagement event is created and posted on the Panel’s website.

The Panel shall, where practicable, hold in-person engagement events in regions or communities where project environmental assessments have been recently conducted or where interest has been expressed in the review.

The Panel shall take into account the timing of traditional activities in the local regions and communities when setting the time and location of in-person engagement events.

Indigenous engagement and consultation

The Panel shall directly engage and consult with Indigenous organizations, groups, communities and individuals during its review in order to gain an understanding of issues and opportunities related to federal environmental assessment processes.

The Panel shall prepare an Indigenous Engagement Plan, outlining how and when it will conduct Indigenous in-person consultation activities. The Panel shall meet with the leadership of National Indigenous Organizations in the preparation of the Plan. In preparing the Plan, the Panel shall take into account the activities associated with the other mandated reviews. This Plan shall be posted on the Panel’s website. The Panel shall work with regional Indigenous organizations in the planning and hosting of Indigenous in-person consultation activities.

The Panel shall also include any procedures necessary for the timely and efficient conduct of these activities. The procedures will allow for the events to be open and to be conducted in a manner that offers all participants an opportunity to participate. The Panel shall ensure that a record of any Indigenous in-person engagement event is created and posted on the Panel’s website.

The Panel shall, where practicable, hold Indigenous in-person consultation activities in regions or communities where project environmental assessments have been recently conducted or where communities have expressed interest in the review.

The Panel shall take into account the timing of traditional activities in the local regions and communities when setting the time and location of Indigenous in-person consultation activities.

Multi-Interest Advisory Committee

A Multi-Interest Advisory Committee with representatives of Indigenous organizations, industry associations and environmental groups will be established by the Minister to provide advice to the Panel.

The Panel will identify a select number of issues which may benefit from discussion by the Multi-Interest Advisory Committee. The Multi-Interest Advisory Committee may also recommend to the Panel issues that would benefit from discussion. The Panel will, by way of a letter to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency, as convener of the Multi-Interest Advisory Committee, describe the issues for which it seeks advice and provide any relevant context to support the discussions by the Multi-Interest Advisory Committee.

The Multi-Interest Advisory Committee will meet as required in order to discuss the issues and will provide its consensus advice, to the extent possible, for the Panel’s consideration and in accordance with any timeline provided by the Panel. Any advice provided to the Panel will be posted on the Panel’s website. The Panel will include a summary of any advice provided in its Report.

Expert advice

Where expertise cannot be provided by the Multi-Interest Advisory Committee, the Panel may retain the services of other experts on certain subjects within its mandate. Any information provided to the Panel by experts will be posted on the Panel’s website.

Environmental assessment review report

The report, reflecting the views of each Panel member, shall include:

  • an executive summary of the report;
  • the conclusions, recommendations and rationale for the conclusions and recommendations of the Panel with respect to the relevant issues within the mandate provided to the Panel; and
  • a summary of the input received and how it was considered, including that from the Multi-Interest Advisory Committee or other experts.

The Panel shall submit the report to the Minister, and on request of the Minister, clarify any of the conclusions and recommendations set out in its report.

Upon receiving the report of the Panel, the Minister will make the report available to the public.

Participant funding

The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency will offer participant funding to Indigenous organizations, groups, communities and individuals to support their participation in the review.

Deliverables

  • Public engagement plan
  • Indigenous engagement plan
  • Report

Official languages

All deliverables and any other documents produced by the Panel for the purpose of communicating information to the public must be produced and made publicly available in both official languages. The Executive Summary of the final report will be made available January 31, 2017 in both official languages and the final report as soon as possible thereafter. Documents provided to the Panel will be made publicly available in the language that they were received.

Confidentiality

All information gathered by the Panel in the course of its work is subject to the provisions of the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act.

Date modified:

2016-08-15

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Review of Environmental Assessment Processes: Biographies of Expert Panel Members

Johanne Gélinas — Panel Chair

Johanne Gélinas is a Partner in Raymond Chabot Grant Thornton’s Strategy and Performance Consulting Group and in charge of its Sustainability and Greenhouse Gas Management practice. Before joining Raymond Chabot Grant Thornton, she led the Sustainable Development and Climate Change practice at Deloitte, from 2007 to 2012.

Johanne was the Canadian Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development from 2000 to 2007. She also served for 10 years as Commissioner with the Government of Quebec BAPE (Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement). She recently led the think tank and public consultation on the social acceptability issue for the Ministère de l’Énergie et des Ressources naturelles du Québec.

Johanne is a certified Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) trainer. She has been teaching at the Collège des administrateurs de sociétés since 2011. She is currently Chair of the Board of Protégez-Vous magazine and a member of the Board of Directors for the Espace LibreTheatre. She was also Chair of RECYC-Québec’s Board of Directors.

She received the 2009 UQAM Recognition Award for her innovative vision and commitment to sustainable development. She also was awarded the Prix Femmes d’affaires du Québec, and won the 2012 Korn/Ferry Award for Enterprise Governance Excellence. Première en affaires recognized her as one of the top eight individuals in Quebec’s governance industry.

Doug Horswill — Panel Member

Doug Horswill retired as Senior Vice President, Sustainability and External Affairs, Teck Resources in April 2014. Doug holds a Bachelor of Applied Science degree in Mineral Engineering and a Master of Arts degree in Economics from the University of British Columbia.

Following 20 years in the Public Service, culminating in the positions of Deputy Minister of Finance and Corporate Relations and Deputy Minister of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources for the Province of British Columbia, Doug joined Cominco Ltd., later Teck Resources Ltd, as Vice President, Environment and Public Affairs in September 1992. He spent the next 22 years developing and leading Teck’s sustainability, community relations, environment, health, safety and external relations areas including Teck’s international zinc and health program.

Doug is past Chairman of the Mining Association of Canada and the Mining Association of British Columbia. He recently served as Chairman of the Board of Resource Works and is a member of the Boards of the Sunny Hill Health Care Centre for Children, The International Fertilizer Development Center, Providence Health Care and the Canadian International Resource Development Institute. He is past Board Member of CARE Canada and the Vancouver Aquarium and Marine Research Center. He is an Executive in Residence for the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada.

Doug was awarded the Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee medal for service in international development charitable sector.

Rod Northey — Panel Member

Rod Northey is an environmental lawyer and partner in the Toronto office of Gowling WLG. He is in his 27th year of private practice and certified by the Law Society of Upper Canada as a specialist in environmental law.

Rod is author of the 2016 Guide to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (LexisNexis), a 1994 annotation of federal environmental assessment law and panel reviews, and law journal articles on infrastructure planning, and federalism and environmental law.

Rod is an adjunct faculty member at Osgoode Hall Law School’s Municipal Law LLM program for a graduate course on environmental protection. He is recognized by his peers in national and international listings, including Lexpert, Canada’s Best Lawyers, and Who’s Who Legal: The International Who’s Who of Business Lawyers.

Throughout his career, Rod has been active in environmental law reform. He has been retained by the federal government to deal with the precautionary principle, apply environmental assessment to Crown corporations, and apply environmental assessment to projects outside Canada. He has also appeared before parliamentary committees on constitutional law and environmental assessment. In Ontario, Rod was on the 2004 task force to establish the Ontario Greenbelt, and on the 2005 advisory committee to reform environmental assessment to better address green energy, transit and waste management projects.

Outside his legal practice, Rod is chair of the Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation and the Greenbelt Fund.

Renée Pelletier — Panel Member

Renée Pelletier is the managing partner at Olthuis Kleer Townshend LLP, one of Canada’s leading Aboriginal rights law firms. Renée is Maliseet and grew up in Nova Scotia. Renée practices Aboriginal rights and environmental law. She regularly advises and represents her Indigenous clients on consultation matters, regulatory and environmental matters, reserve land management and impacts and benefits agreements. Her practice also includes work on Aboriginal and treaty rights litigation and specific claims. She has litigated judicial review applications and appeared before various levels of courts on motions, trials and appeals. Renée was cited by the Supreme Court of Canada in the high-profile case R. v. Ipeelee, 2012 SCC 13. Renée is especially passionate about assisting her Indigenous clients in achieving greater self-determination. She also strives to incorporate the legal traditions of her Indigenous clients into the work she does on their behalf.

Renée has worked at Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto, volunteered for the Native Women’s Resource Centre, and worked with the Innocence Project about the case of Native American Activist Leonard Peltier. Renée was also a Native Court Worker at College Park Criminal Court.

Renée is a member of the New Brunswick and Ontario Bars. She is French Acadian, her first language is French, and she is fluently bilingual in both French and English. Renée is also a member of the Indigenous Bar Association.

 

About prosperitysaskatchewan

Consultant on Saskatchewan's natural resources.

Posted on August 17, 2016, in diamonds, economic impact, miscellaneous, oil, other minerals, political, potash, uranium and nuclear. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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